Luciferian Ancestors : Madeleine Montalban

Madeline Montalban was an accomplished occultist and ceremonial magician, an astrologer, writer, journalist and teacher who co-founded her own esoteric school of high magic called the “Order of the Morning Star” (OMS), through which she propagated her own form of Luciferianism.

Madeline was born in January 8, 1910 in Blackpool, Lancashire as Madeline Sylvia Royals. her father Willie Royals was an insurance agent while her mother Marion Neruda (nee´ Shaw) was a tailor’s daughter from Oldham, Lancashire. Her parents married on the 28th June 1909, which was followed by Madeline’s birth seven months later. Little is known about her early life, schooling and education etc, although she appears to have had a strained relationship with her parents. During her youth she was afflicted with a virulent strain of the polio disease, which left her with a lifelong withered leg and a pronounced limp. As a child she suffered from ill-health and led a lonely existence with only the company of strict parents. According to her biography (published in 2012 by Julia Philips,) during bouts of illness and while bedridden and convalescing, she took to reading literature and enjoyed the works of Bulwer Lytton, H. Rider Haggard and E.T.A. Hoffman.  She also avidly read the Bible, particularly texts from the Old Testament, and later said that trying to understand the esoteric meanings of its myths eventually led her to the occult path. She believed they contained secret messages, a theme that became central to her later Luciferian beliefs. In her opinon the Old Testament was a book of magic and the New Testament a book of mysticism.

In the early 1930s, she left Blackpool, and moved south to London. Although she made the acquaintance of many of London’s leading occultists such as Aleister Crowley, Austin Osman Spare, Kenneth Grant and Gerald Gardner, she decided not to follow any particular path or leader and develop her own system of magic. Here in London she in 1933 wrote her first article on astrology for the popular London Life magazine entitled The Stars in the Heavens. She continued to write for that magazine until 1953, during which time she used a number of pseudonyms including: Madeline Alvarez, Dolores del Castro, Michael Royals, Regina Norcliff and Athene Deluce. From February 1947, she also wrote a regular astrological column entitled You and Your Stars under the name of Nina de Luna. Her main pseudonym “Madeline Montalban” was based upon the name of her favourite film star, the Mexican actor Ricardo Montalbán.

By the end of the 1930’s, Madeline was living in Grays Inn Road, Holborn, where in 1939 she married a press photographer George Edward North. Madeline bore him a daughter, Rosanna, but their relationship later deteriorated and he eventually left her for another woman. She would later inform friends that during the Second World War her husband had served as an officer in the Royal Navy while she served in the Women’s Royal Naval Service (WRNS). Gerald Gardner later claimed that when he first met Madeline during the war she was wearing a WRNS uniform and that she allegedly worked as a “personal clairvoyant and psychic advisor” to Lord Louis Mountbatten.

After the war, Madeline continued to work as a writer/journalist in London using an array of pseudonyms, and from February 1947 under the name of Nina del Luna, she penned a regular astrological column in the London Life magazine entitled You and Your Stars. She also undertook freelance work and in the late 1940’s was approached by Michael Houghton (aka Michael Juste) to edit a manuscript for Gerald Gardner’s novel High Magic’s Aid, later published in 1949. Houghton owned the famous Atlantis bookshop in Museum Street, London (located opposite the British Museum), which he had founded in 1922. He had a temple in the basement of the shop from where he ran his own magical group “the Order of Hidden Masters”. Madeline by this time had become a regular visitor to the shop.

In August 1953, Madeline stopped writing for the London Life magazine and from then until her death in 1982 wrote articles on Astrology, Magic and Tarot for one of the country’s leading esoteric magazine Prediction. Starting with a series on using tarot cards, from May 1960 she was employed to write a regular astrological column. Through her articles in Prediction, Madeline soon began receiving correspondence from people seeking further occult information, some she invited to meet at her home and they became her private students. In 1956, she co-founded the “Order of the Morning Star” (OMS) with her partner Nicolas Heron. After her relationship with Heron ended in 1964, Madeline returned to London and for awhile occupied a flat at 8 Holly Hill in Hampstead, which was owned by the husband of one of her OMS students, the Latvian exile and poet Velta Snikere.

In 1966 she moved again and settled into a flat at Queen Alexandra Mansions, 3 Grape Street in St. Giles Circus, Holborn, from where she continued to run and develop the OMS. Grape Street is a few yards walk from the famous Atlantis bookshop and the British Museum. The building, with turrets, balconies and leaded windows the flat seemed out of place in modem London. Michael Howard recounts “Inside this otherworldly effect was heightened by the flat’s unusual antique furnishings and glassfronted cabinets and bookcases full of occult curios and arcane books dating back to the 19th century. Candles and incense were continually burning adding to the atmosphere. It was the most haunted place I have ever been in. Staying the night in the guest room was always a daunting experience, as you lay awake until the early hours listening to ghostly footsteps padding down the hall and the doorknobs rattling. During the day the place was alive with elementals, that you could just vaguely glimpse out of the corner of your eye as small darting shadows, as Madeline was not one for banishing spirits. She took it all in her stride and was ever youthful.”

She said that much of her occult knowlege had been gained by “years of study in dusty libraries and museums.” The key to her success as a magus and occult teacher was how she managed to synthesis ancient Chaldean stellar lore with Egyptian mythology, the medieval sorcery of the grimoires, the natural magic of the Renaissance and a Luciferian gnosis. Her primary major sources for her magical system were the Chaldean Oracles, the Picatrix and Corpus Hermeticum, the Heptameron of Peter d’Abano, Agrippa’s Occult Philosophy; Sir Francis Barratt’s The Magus, The Key of Solomon, The Book of Abramelin the Mage and the Enochian system of Dr John Dee. Much of her practical magical and occult work was similar to the traditional practices of the old cunning folk. It used the minimum of magical props – a candle, some incense, a relevant Tarot card or two, some magical sigils and an incantation written on virgin parchment in one of the magical alphabets, and a few coins.

Describing herself as a “pagan”, Montalban’s personal faith was Luciferian in basis, revolving around the veneration of Lucifer, or Lumiel, whom she considered to be a benevolent angelic being who had aided humanity’s development. Within her Order, she emphasised that her followers discover their own personal relationship with the angelic beings, including Lumiel. Montalban considered astrology to be a central part of her religious worldview, and always maintained that one could be a good magician only if they had mastered astrology. Her correspondence course focused around the seven planetary bodies that were known in the ancient world and the angelic beings that she associated with them: Michael (Sun), Gabriel (Moon), Samael (Mars), Raphael (Mercury), Sachiel (Jupiter), Anael (Venus) and Cassiel (Saturn). Each of these beings was in turn associated with certain days, hours, minerals, plants, and animals, each of which could be used in the creation of talismans that invoked the angelic power. Montalban disliked the theatrical use of props and rites in ceremonial magic, such as that performed by the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, preferring a more simplistic use of ritual. Madeline believed a lot of nonsense was talked about initiations into this or that magical lodge or high degree. She believed that the most important initiations did not take place behind the doors of humanmade temples. To her life was the Great Initiation and that is why we were incarnated on Earth as it was a
training school for souls.

Madeline passed to spirit on January 11, 1982 after a long struggle against cancer. This condition had been helped by her love of Woodbine cigarettes and cheap Spanish wine, but Madeline was a down-to-earth person with human flaws like anyone else. She once told a journalist: “I cannot stand those so-called ‘magicians’ who treat the whole thing as an intellectual exercise – not smoking, not drinking, being strictly vegetarian . . . that is nonsense. Magic should make life easier. That’s what it is all about!”

When she died in 1982, copyright to all her writings and the OMS correspondence course passed on to her daughter Rosanna. After her funeral, Rosanna approached occult author Jo Sheridan, had worked for Prediction from 1959 through the early sixties, during which time she had edited many of Madeline’s articles, and asked if she and her husband Alfred Douglas (a student of Montalban, author of the book The Tarot: the origins, meaning and uses of the cards, a work heavily inspired by Madeline’s teachings) would be willing to continue her mother’s work. As well as being authors themselves, Jo and Alfred had the practical skills needed to keep the School and correspondence course going. Jo and Alfred happily agreed and a contract was drawn up, modelled on a standard publisher’s contract, under which they were given exclusive “World Rights” to publish Madeline’s correspondence course. There was also a written agreement between them and the executors of Madeline’s Will, authorising them to publish Madeline’s works.

In the 1980s, Jo Sheridan (aka Patricia Douglas) opened an alternative therapy centre situated in Church Street, Stoke Newington, North London, before she and her husband Alfred retired to Rye, East Sussex in 2002, from where she ran the OMS correspondence course until her death in 2011. Since then Alfred Douglas has run the OMS and its correspondence course, which continues today.

In his 2002 article on Madeline for the Cauldron, Michael Howard mistakeningly mentioned that the Order she had started did not survive her death. However he noted “The Order of the Morning Star still operates on the inner planes. As such its ‘temple not made with human hands’ can be contacted in the astral realms by those with an open mind and an open heart who sincerely seek the mysteries of the Elder Gods and
contact with Lord Lumiel and his ‘fallen angels’. This is Madeline’s legacy to modem occultism and one for which she will always be remembered long after the last of her earthly students has passed to the Land of the Summer Stars.”

Sources

Michael Howard; Teachings of the Light: Madeline Montalban and the Order of the Morning Star; published in the Luminous Stone: Lucifer in Western Esotericism editied by Daniel Schulke and Michael Howard; Three Hands Press 2016

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madeline_Montalban

http://www.the-cauldron.org.uk/Resources/MagusStGiles.pdf

http://www.sheridandouglas.co.uk/oms/

Julia Phillips; Madeline Montalban, the Magus of St. Giles; Neptune Press 2012

St Lucia

Lucia was born in 283 to a noble family in the city of Siracusa, Sicily. Her father was a Roman, but he died when she was 5 years old. Her mother, Eutychia was of Greek origin. When Lucia’s mother became ill, she went on a pilgrimage with her mother, in 300, to Catania, to St. Agatha’s tomb to seek a cure for her.
Her mother was cured, and when Lucia saw this, she became a Christian, and took a vow of virginity, vowed her life to Christ, and gave away her dowry to the poor. Her mother, not aware of Lucy’s vow, offered her hand in marriage to a pagan young man. The groom became offended when Lucia turned him down, and took his case to Paschasius, the Governor of Siracusa, claiming Lucia was a witch. Paschasius tried to convince her to marry her groom, but she refused. Then he ordered her to be carried to a brothel, but she became so heavy that even oxen could not move her. Later she was tarred, put on the stake to be burned to death, her eyes were removed by the executioner, and she was stabbed with a dagger, yet she did not die. When the priest was called, she finally took her last breath. (Another legend says she plucked out her own eyes because a suitor admired them.)

Other than that, not much is known about her life. She believed in God and she died for her beliefs. In the 6th century, she was declared a saint, patroness of the blind and those with eye trouble.

Her name comes of the Latin word lux, which means light; therefore she is also remembered as a “bearer of light”. That is why her feast day was placed on December 13th, which at the time was the shortest day of the year. (With the change of calendars from the Julian to the Gregorian in 1582, several days were added, so that the solstice now occurs on December 21st or 22nd). Lucy the Lightbringer rules that longest night. It is considered an optimum time for magic spells, divination and spiritual activity. In Austria, Lucy’s Light is a folk name for second sight—psychic ability.

Was Lucy a martyr or a witch? We remember her as both, but in some folklore she is considered mostly a witch.

Her feast day is important during Advent but also popularly appears amongst several different folkloric accounts involving werewolves and witches. In Sweden the Santa Lucia’s night originated in an older tradition of Lussinata, the beginning of a 12 day period ending on Yule whose nights were haunted by the Lussi, a nocturnal demon or witch who would punish and snatch ill behaved children or disappear anyone caught outside on her nights. Likewise she was joined on these nights by the Lussiferda, a host of trolls, goblins and restless spirits who wandered about with her.

Her feast is one of the Ember days of the liturgical calendar, which according again to Honorius (or the anonymous author of the magical manual of attributed to this pope) makes her feast an apt time for the conjuring and binding of demons. In Christendom the Ember days are weeks set for fasting and prayer occurring seasonally. Given the prerequisite of devout prayer, confession, and fasting prior to conjuration that is called for in many of the grimoires there is little reason to wonder why these particular weeks would be chosen for the timing of such magical workings. The ritual tasks of the necromancer would not appear suspicious or out of place, given the context of the liturgical calendar and popular observances.

The other Ember days include one in the spring, typically beginning the first Sunday of Lent, one in the Summer after Pentecost, one after the Exaltation of the Cross in September and finally after St. Lucia’s feast. Another interesting appearance of the Ember days appears in the confession of the 17th century Livonian werewolf, Thiess of Kaltenbrun. Thiess, an octogenarian at the time of his confession and trials claimed that on three nights a year: Saint’s Lucy’s, Pentecost, and Saint John’s, that he and others he called the “Hounds of God” would become werewolves and descend into Hell to return with grain and livestock stolen by the Devil and his witches. When their battles were won the werewolves would ensure a bountiful harvest, but on the years where they suffered losses, it assured famine. Thiess’ account, along with the account of the Benandanti of Friuli (see Night Battles by Carlo Ginzburg) is believed to show a rare glimpse into an ancient agrarian cult that at on point was possibly common across central Europe, and preserved by a few in their observances on these now Christian holy days. For more on the connection between werewolves and witches in popular, and historical record, see the works of Claude Lecouteux, particularly Witches, Werewolves and Fairies: Shapeshifters and Astral Doubles in the Middle Ages.

Her patronage over sight and the eyes makes her an excellent saint to call upon in to aid in the ability to see the unseen, as well as the ability to heal diseases and afflictions of the eye, including that of the Evil Eye. Here we close with a novena to this blessed saint. Beginning on the night of December 4th on a clean space draped in white, ideally with a cross and icon of Saint Lucia, offer a white seven-day candle and frankincense alongside the orison we have included below along with the recipe for a psychic vision oil. This is a time to ask for her intercession and protection as well as to make magica materia, such as the Holy Vision oil, to be consecrated and blessed by the devotion of these nine nights of vigil held in her honor and by the power of her spirit descending upon it by the grace of the Holy Trinity and Queen of All-Saints, the Blessed Virgin. On the 8th night prepare a dough for a traditional sweet bread made for her night, to be baked and offered on the 9th and final night of her novena.

May the Lord and all his saints keep you in health and high spirits, and in this time of year when night predominates, may the fire your eyes burn bright and all the shades and horrors of winter be dispelled by the light and majesty of Saint Lucy!

Salve! Sancta virgo et martyr beatissimus, ora pro nobis.


Saint Lucia’s Holy Vision Oil

You will need:

  • Frankincense resin
  • Myrrh resin
  • Eyebright
  • Star Anise
  • Mugwort
  • Wormwood
  • 2 blue Evil Eye charms
  • Olive oil

Crush and macerate the Frankincense, Myrrh, and Eyebright in some olive oil. Place this in a glass container and pour in more oil, enough to cover the crushed mixture. Let this sit for the duration of the novena on the altar of Saint Lucia.

In a new container place a few pieces of Mugwort, Wormwood, Star Anise, Frankincense, Eyebright, Myrrh and two blue Evil Eye charms. Strain the oil from the first container into the new one with the whole herbs and resins. The result should be rich-colored oil with a fragrant scent with a few pieces of resin, root, and herb.

The Orison of St. Lucia

Oh Saint Lucia thou preferred to have thy eyes gouged and torn than deny thy faith.

Oh Saint Lucia the pain of having thy eyes torn was not greater than the one of denying Christ. And as an extraordinary miracle He gave thee new eyes, healthy and perfect, to reward thee for thy virtue and faith.

Protector from illnesses of the eyes I plead to thee to bless this oil, to grant the second sight and to protect from the Evil Eye, so as thou may protect my sight and heal the illness of my eyes.

Oh Saint Lucia protect the light of my eyes, so I may see the beauty of creation, the light of the Sun, the color of the flowers, the smiling of children. Protect also the eyes of my soul, of my faith, through which I can see my God and learn His teachings so as I may learn with thee and always refer to thee.

Saint Lucia protect my eyes and preserve my faith.

Saint Lucia protect my eyes and preserve my faith.

Saint Lucia give me light and discernment.

Saint Lucia give me light and discernment.

Saint Lucia pray for us.

Amen.

Here is a recipe for a traditional holiday bread for St Lucy’s Night:

St Lucia Saffron Buns

St Lucia by AzK // Shandi

Rosarium Imperatrix Inferni

“My children,” Mary seems to say, “when the enemy assails you, fly to me. Cast your eyes on me, and be of good heart. Since I am your defender, victory is assured to you.” In this way, turning to Mary is a most secure means to conquer all the assaults of hell. For she is even the queen of hell and sovereign mistress of the demons, since she is the one who tames and crushes them. St. Bernardine of Siena expresses the thought this way: “The most Blessed Virgin rules over the regions of hell. She is therefore called the ruling mistress of the demons, because she brings them into subjection.” —St. Alphonsus Liguori, The Glories of Mary

This is a version of the Holy Rosary I employ as a devotion for Maria as Empress of Hell, which replaces the Credo with the oldest surviving Marian prayer, Sub tuum praesidium (Beneath Thy Protection). While some may see this as heretical, I don’t particularly see it as a heresy, if anything it makes it more Marian. The Sub Tuum also predates the Credo. The rosary as we have it now went through centuries of change. It’s no more heretical than using the rosary as another chaplet for which there are many. The goal when constructing this devotion was to make it applicible to both orthodox Marian devotees as well as goetic sorcerers.

How can devotion to Mary be of use to the goetic sorcerer? For this I turn to my friend and practitioner of Marian diablerie, Maria Miles.


Not only does the Glorious Virgin provide refuge from the attacks of the spirits, but unconditional forgiveness for those who fall into sin by trafficking with them. We find this in the account of Saint Theophilus the Penitent, whose tale is traditionally attributed to have inspired the legends of Faust and his pact with the Devil. Her threefold ability to dominate evil spirits, protect and absolve those who invoke them make her the quintessential patron of any who practices Goetia. Given this knowledge of her, it makes sense what is said by Pope Honorius (in the Grimorie of Honorius) that the eves of her feast days, nineteen in all, are most propitious for the conjuring and binding of devils.

Her mystic title of Door is just as meaningful, as the liminality inherent in this title is vital to the calling forth and the manifestation of spirits in the Goetic arts. The use of the rosary for me is tied to initiating trance states where I am able to perceive and communicate with spirits more effectively by enhancing my mediumistic talents. Her association with the Moon, whose sphere disseminates the rays and virtues of the other six planets upon the sublunar Earth, is another demonstration of her title of Porta Coeli, or Gate of Heaven. The moon likewise is the only planet of primary import and consideration in the planning of conjurations, and whose timing is vital to Goetic praxis.

Mary can be appealed to when a pact has gone wrong or been unfulfilled, her aspect of Undoer of Knots being called upon for intercession when a sorcerer has become too entangled in their workings.

To the witch and practitioner of Marian Diablerie, it is an important key to remember that Christ is but a hollow mask for the spirits of Infernus. There is no image more famous or more adequate a synecdoche for human suffering than that of the crucified Christ. For this reason, that image is beloved by these spirits for misery is their sustenance, but Mary is the root and gate of this mystery. Just as she is mother of us all, so is she a mother to Devils. Mater Lamiae, radix et porta Inferni et Coeli.


Rosarium Imperatrix Inferni

Begin by making the Sign of the Cross
In Nomine Patris, et Filii, et Spiritus Sancti. Amen.

On the Cross – Sub tuum praesidium

Sub tuum praesidium confugimus,
Sancta Dei Genetrix. Nostras deprecationes ne despicias in necessitatibus nostris, sed a periculis cunctis libera nos semper, Virgo gloriosa et benedicta.

On the Lone Beads – Pater Noster
Pater Noster, qui es in cælis, sanctificetur nomen tuum. Adveniat regnum tuum. Fiat voluntas tua, sicut in cælo et in terra. Panem nostrum quotidianum da nobis hodie. Et dimitte nobis debita nostra, sicut et nos dimittimus debitoribus nostris. Et ne nos inducas in tentationem, sed libera nos a malo. Amen.

On the grouped beads – Ave Imperatrix Inferni
Ave Maria, Mater Domini Nostri,
Regina Cœli, Domina Mundi, et Imperatrix Inferni. Dona Nobis Pacem, Nunc et in Hora Mortis Nostrae.
Amen

De Mysteriis Imperatrix Inferni

I – Adam Novam videndum in Calvariae loco
II – Corpus ipsius portandum ad sepulcrum et in inferno imponendum eum
III – Videndum super sepulcrum vincendum ipsius
IV – Ipsius liberatae peccato dormiscendum
V – Ipsam coronandum Novam Evam

End with the Memorare

Memorare, O piissima Virgo Maria, non esse auditum a saeculo, quemquam ad tua currentem praesidia, tua implorantem auxilia, tua petentem suffragia, esse derelictum. Ego tali animatus confidentia, ad te, Virgo Virginum, Mater, curro, ad te venio, coram te gemens peccator assisto. Noli, Mater Verbi, verba mea despicere; sed audi propitia et exaudi. Amen.

English Prayers

The Sign of the Cross

In the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. Amen.

Sub tuum praesidium

Under thy protection we seek refuge, O Holy Mother of God;
In our needs, despise not our petitions,
but deliver us always from all dangers,
O Glorious and Blessed Virgin.

Ave Imperatrix Inferni

Hail Mary, Mother of Our Lord,
Queen of Heaven, Lady of the World, and Empress of Hell.
Grant us peace, now and at the hour of our death.
Amen.

Memorare

Remember, O most gracious Virgin Mary, that never was it known that anyone who fled to thy protection, implored thy help, or sought thy intercession was left unaided. Inspired with this confidence, I fly to thee, O Virgin of virgins, my Mother; to thee do I come; before thee I stand, sinful and sorrowful. O Mother of the Word Incarnate, despise not my petitions, but in thy mercy hear and answer me. Amen.

The Mysteries of the Empress of Hell

1.) Beholding the New Adam on the Hill of the Skull
2.) Bearing his Body to the Sepulcher and placing him in Hell
3.) Witnessing his Triumph from the Grave
4.) Her Falling Asleep free from Sin
5.) Her Crowning as the New Eve

Hail Mary, Empress of Hell

Ave Maria mater Domini nostri Iesus Christi regina cœli domina mundi imperatrix inferni misere mei & totius populi Christiani Amen.

Antiphon from the Saltair Mhuire, attributed to Domhnall Albannach Ó Troighthigh, in manuscript dated 1477.

Hail Mary, mother of our Lord Jesus Christ, Queen of Heaven, Lady of the World, Empress of Hell, have mercy on me and the whole of Christian people.

To speak of Mary as Empress of Hell may sound surprising and even confusing. But St. Alphonsus explains.

“Not only is the most Blessed Virgin the queen of heaven and of all saints. She is also queen of hell and of all evil spirits. For she overcame them valiantly by her virtues. From the very beginning God foretold the victory and empire that our queen would one day gain over the serpent, when he announced to him that a woman would come into the world to conquer him: “I will put enmity between you and the woman. . . . She will crush your head” (Gn 3:15). And who could this woman, his enemy, be but Mary, who by her fair humility and holy life always conquered him and beat down his strength?”

The most famous and enduring example of this, and possibly the source of the Queen of Heaven/Empress of Hell dichotomous terminology, is variations on the Theophilus legend. This is especially interesting because Theophilus is the forerunner to one Herr Doktor Faustus. In this legend/miracle story, Theophilus makes a transaction with the devil for the rights to his soul. Near death, he comes to regret his decision, and begs Mary to help him. As Mary is infinitely merciful, she does. She girds her loins for battle, descends into hell, and steals back the charter conveying Theophilus’ soul to the devil!
Possibly the most interesting part of this miracle story is Mary’s mission to hell is portrayed as warfare. The tales evoke the devil’s anger, and use language of violence and theft to describe Mary’s actions. In her guise as empress of hell–that is, more powerful even than Satan–she is not the mother of mercy, she is the “queen of vengeance.”

An Evening with Anima Sola

“On ghosts which appear at the crossroads, or souls from the spirtual world, who on a mission from God come to this corporeal world in search of orisons to be purified from the mistakes they committed in this world against the Lord our God” – On Ghosts from the Book of St. Cyprian, translated by Humberto Maggi.

I began with Psalms 68 verse 1-5 and 134 for the Exorcism & Blessing of the Working Area, fumigating with frankincense, and asperging with holy water. For “the Opening of the Rites & Workings of the Wise” I prayed Psalms 141 verses 1-2 & 104 verses 1-9 (as per the Charmer’s Psalter by Gemma Gary) followed with the fifty-first Psalm as confession (as per the Grimorium Verum). Lighting the candles upon Saint Cyprian’s altar, I prayed the Lord’s Prayer, then knocked 9 times on the altar, each time calling out “Saint Cyprian”. I then proceeded with the Sorcerer’s prayer to Saint Cyprian, with my San Cipriano amparo between my hands, asking him to guide me and protect for the work ahead. I took my amparo, as well as my Exterminator Talisman from the Book of St Cyprian: the Sorcerer’s Treasure, and placed them in a red flannel bag attached to a cord so it could be worn in the style of a lamen. I constructed a ward with St Michael the Archangel, asking him to only allow the named spirits through.

I began the chaplet for la Anima Sola at midnight (it being the hour of Saturn no less, an appropriate for contacting spirits as per la Vèritable Magie Noire) and I had Mattie’s box open on the shrine for it. (Mattie’s box being a box of grave dirt from a young lady who was killed by a drunk driver on prom night. A precious gift from my dear friend Jack Grayle, author of the Hekatæon). I began the prayers, devoutly kissing my Pardon Crucifix before each Lord’s Prayer, as to earn an extra indulgence for the dead. As I prayed, the atmosphere began to change very quickly. There were tons of chills and thumps in the room, while getting a very hot feeling inside myself, along with bursts of severe hunger pangs. As the chaplet progressed I felt her cool, and by the end she no longer felt upset about having her sleep interrupted.

As I prayed and scryed the candle flames, I had a few vivid visions of a young woman in fire, alternating with visions of Maria. The flames were the most persistent image in the ‘visions’, these visions being in the mind’s eye more so than appearing ‘externally’.

After completing the chaplet and prayers, I sat and meditated, the atmosphere haunted yet not menacing. I thanked Mattie and gave her a dismismal from the Book of Cyprian for human spirits, then closed the ritual with prayers to Maria, then Psalm 150 as thanks for blessings and answers recieved, ending with three Lord’s Prayers.

I then cleansed with a previously prepared bath of rue, basil, rosemary, hyssop, sea salt, holy water, flordia water, and cascarilla; reciting Psalm 101 “Against Evil Spirits & People” (again, the Charmer’s Psalter by Gemma Gary). I did the Holy Rosary before bed, my sleep still rather restless although dreamless.

The Book of St. Cyprian: the Sorcerer’s Treasure

“Maybe there never was a a book so coveted and searched for, neither one which arose more passions and desires to be possessed…we are talking about the Book of Saint Cyprian, popularly known as Ciprianillo.” – El Libro der San Cipriano by Felix Castro Vicente.

The Black Books of Cyprian, many of which arose from Spain and Portugal, were popularized and spread throughout the New World. Their influence ranged from North America to as far south as Brazil and would come to influence a variety of practices from traditions found there.

However the Libre de San Cipriano: Tesoro del Hechicero is considered to be a talisman in of itself, in folklore merely by possessing it one can become a sorcerer. Indeed, a brujo friend of mine has commented often on the strange synchronicites that happen more often than not from happening to own the book or from begining a devotional relationship with the sorcerous saint. I shall offer an example from my own life.

I recently ordered Humberto Maggi’s translation of the Book of St. Cyprian (which among others, contains an English translation of Tesoro del Hechicero) and recieved it on a Wednesday, along with a package of Santisima Muerte supplies from a brujo friend. I went to show it off to my friends at the Botanica Macumba. They were unfortunately closed so I went up the street a bit to a different botanica to stock up on some needed supplies. I was close by a spot were black nightshade grows so I decided to go over there and see if I might harvest some to replant. This was a spur of the moment decision, I wasn’t really sure what I was doing nor actually equipped for it. Still felt like it was ‘the right time’ to do this so I went along with it.
I get to the spot, an abandoned lot. I find they have been doing construction to the lot, there’s a large dirt mound that catches my eye. I proceed to the nightshade, noticing an empty bottle of Miracle-Gro Liquid Plant Food I can put a cutting in to take home and do so. That dirt mound kept catching my eye however and when I wonder why aloud… crow cawed thrice. I go over and find sticking out of the mound an elder tree… well what is left one the leaves still green, the tree stubbornly clinging to life. Its Wednesday, the day of Mercury. The Grimorium Vernum calls for an elder wand cut in the day and hour of Mercury. I check my planetary hours phone app. It is not the correct hour, and I find myself lacking any offering for the tree spirit. A thought occurs and I speak it aloud “I could cut it to size in the day and hour of Mercury”, crow cawed thrice again. “This piece is the perfect size, it has two small branches growing out… I could offer to transplant those as a pact to harvest it now…” again crow cawed thrice. I went to work without hesitation, pulling dirt chunks out of the way, I get to the branch I wish to harvest and in the name of the Trinity by the power and intercession of San Cipriano I broke it off stating my promise to transplant the two small branches and transfer them to the wild one day if they made it to be strong trees.

A Protective Ward with St Michael the Archangel

Here is a simple protective spell, with layers of protection and plenty of tools to feed the spirits to work their roles.

St Michael’s candle is surrounded by a base of a trio of cleansing/banishing herbs as well as the materia for fiery wall of protection. The candle is anointed with Abramelin Holy Oil and dressed with fiery wall of protection. Pslam 92 verses 12-15 and the Prayer to St Michael the Archangel are prayed over the candle to bless it and charge it Michael’s protection.

The idea behind this is as you light the candle and say your prayer to Michael, you are essentially asking Michael to “guard the gates”, with the spell staying active so long as the candle is lit. I typically use this an extra protective measure when doing work with Santisima Muerte or the Dead.

Recipes

Cleansing/Banishing: Rue, basil, rosemary

Fiery Wall of Protection: sea salt, frankincense, myrrh, dragon’s blood, ginger, cinnamon

A Call to Hekate, Child of Destruction and the Starry Sky

I offer you this spice, O Prodigy of Nyx,
Child of Destruction and the Starry Sky
Come to me, Beloved Mistress,
Triple Headed, Triple Voiced Hekate
Hear my enchanted call
Carried to you by spirits of Air
Crossroads Queen, lover of solitude
Having your meal among the tombs
Come to me Black Bitch, Witch Mother
Brimo, Furious One, Formless Fire
Thea Deinos, Dread Goddess, Bender of Proud Necks
I call to you, O Ghost-Faced Moon
Fearful One, Deathly One, Grave-Goddess
Come now, with the Cry of the Beast
Blessed Bitch, Leader of the Pack
Agriope Lykania, loving the mournful wailing of hounds
Unbound, Ungrit, Unconstrained
Dread Goddess, Clad in Serpent Tresses
Primal Serpent, Eternal Witch
I call to you, kindly hear my sacred chants
Come and make the earth tremble with your bull like roar
Grave-Breaker, World-Ender,
Goddess of Dark, Quiet & Frightful One
You who drinks blood and feasts on hearts
Eater of Filth, you who devours the Untimely Dead,
You who brings Death and Destruction,
Who makes Grief resound and spreads Madness
Come to my sacrifices

[Image above – Supreme Goddess by MrNat]

An Incense blend for Deiphon

(Warning contains Baneful ie TOXIC plants, do not burn inside and only in well ventilated areas!)
Yew
Henbane
Datura
Wolfsbane
Dittany of Crete
Myrrh
Wormwood
Mugwort
Cypress

Some notes on preparation.
This is a 9 ingredient incense, made in three parts.
The base for this incense is the trio of myrrh, wormwood, and mugwort; all in equal parts. This constitutes about half of the final mixture, and makes for a wonderful Hekate incense on it’s own, and is safe to burn indoors.
The poisons (datura, henbane, wolfsbane) make up about 1/8th of the final mix. It’s equal parts datura leaves and henbane seeds with a small pinch of wolfsbane.
The rest is made of equal parts dittany of Crete, yew needles, and cypress bark.

the Call of the Hekatæon

***Night 1***
I began the ritual by slowly chanting Io Hekate Io Ho 108x on a set of mala beads I anointed in henbane oil and then buried at a graveyard trivia for the space of the dark moon. The repetition of the mantra helped to center myself, filling my mind and heart with love for Hekate and served to build up the rite and really get the energy flowing. It’s a simple enough ritual, a devotional poem you silently read after washing your hands thrice and dusting them with cinnamon, a sigil to draw and contemplate, as well as a guided meditation followed by reading the poem out loud three times. Regardless of its simplicity, I felt Her, not strongly, a distant prescence yet there.
***Night 2***
The 2nd night is certainly titanic! I began as the night before 3x washing of hands, dusting of them with cinnamon, and 108 recitations of IO HEKATE IO HO to prepare. The guided meditation shows that my senses have improved somewhat, I couldn’t clearly see but I did clearly sense it, with the visualization of the glowing trident sigil being the most clear. And then the hymn! By the third recitation of the hymn Her presence was undeniable, I could sense Her before me, behind me, to my left to my right, above me below me, indeed within me; Her energy completely saturated my temple room. This was an enormous presence, quite heavy in all honesty and a bit more than I was expecting! I received communion in the form of inspiration and began to use the witchbreath, breathing Her in and out, mingling Her energy with mine, silently chanting IO HEKATE IO HO with each full breath cycle, again using my mala beads for a count of 108. This helped immensely and lessened the initial discomfort.
***Night 3***
This might began as the others. The results will not be reported as they are highly personal.
***Night 4***
Tonight was…. delightful to say the least. In the devotional hymn there is one chant you’re only supposed to say if you’re sure you want to call Her…. well She certainly responds, Her prescence grew with each repetition. While last night was very emotional, tonight was simply full of awe at Her mystery. Last night She was within, tonight I sensed Her above me. Towering above me, the very vortex I ‘saw’ durning the pathworking portion of the ritual but felt much more vividly. A storm even blew in to coincide with my chanting….
***Night 5****
It was another beautiful, intense and aweful (as in full of awe) experience! The most startling was getting an electric tingle feeling as I said “and what the Titans smell is blood”.
And then after the hymn! I felt Her in all 8 directions of the compass around me and towering above me. They coalesced into one and I felt the double helix from the pathworking caressing my aura, subtly changing me. I caught a few sights sounds and feels (my nose was unforuntaely blocked up due to pollen) although I simply registered those and let them pass by.

[the notes for Nights 6,7,&8 appear to be lost]

The 9th Night of the Call of the Hekatæon
I fasted for the 3 days leading up, rather than the prescribed one. (I typically gradually fast, slowly cutting out things, yesterday was green tea with honey and nothing else.)
At midnight, after preparing in the usual way, I began pathwalking to meet Her. There She stood at the crossroads towering above me, 3 faced, six armed; the face of a maiden, the face of a hound, the face of a serpent . She held torches of oak, and with a dagger beckoned me closer. I opened my eyes then and began the prayer, singing BRIMO, BRIMO, BRIM! Again the feeling of being encompassed by Her, feeling Her flow into me, as the Dead danced at the circles edge. The energy increased with each stanza, it built to a fever point… BRIMO BRIMO HEKATE I sang; and with my heart full of love, awe and mystery, shoving a thorn deep into my flesh. I offered Her my blood so that no part of me was kept from Her and plunged my bloody finger once twice thrice into the circle sealing my devotion, thus activating the Hekatæon. I closed the book, held it to my heart as I kissed the sigil and gave the sigil to the flames, its ashes collected to later consecrate the strapalos. I sat and basked in the energy until I became very tired. I went to bed and dreamt of a cosmic crossroads, a toad awaiting me….

Io Io Ekati!
Photo by Jack Grayle

Addendum – the first night of the Waxing Moon

I went down to the ‘end of the world’, a spot on the Missisippi river, a liminal spot marked not just by its name but also as it is a spot were land sky and water all meet. I offered incense to the spirits of place, the river spirits and such then lighting myrrh I began to sing the consecration song. The sun was setting, and inspired by being in a liminal space at a liminal time I began calling Brimo for the first night of the lunar month of 27 epithets.
PHORBA PHORBA BRIMO AZZIEBYA I sang 9 times, calling to Her to me, then began a heartfelt prayer to Her, She who is the Furious One , the Burner, the one who illuminates, incinerates, and transforms what was into what will be. This turned into a spontaneous chant of:
BRIMO BRIMO BRIM
BRIMO BRIMO BRIM
BRIMO BRIMO BRIM
Burn, burn, burn away
Burn, burn, burn away
Burn, burn, burn away
O blessed Brimo, O Furious One, O Burner,
Burn, burn, burn away all that separates me from my Queen,
Transform what was into what shall be.

I felt a gradual building up of warmth within me, so much so that the previously warm breeze felt quite chill in comparison. My meditation and chanting was interrupted by sensing two others approaching. I look back and a moment later two other people, a couple on a sunset stroll, approach into view. I reflect upon this, and reach a personal realization. I ask for sign if such is the case, immediately I am answered by a crash of the river against the rocks near were I sit. I ground and center, then thanking the spirits, leave without looking back.